Literacy Labs

 

“We all tell ourselves stories and we live by the stories we tell ourselves.  What kinds of stories are you telling yourself?” – Dr. Carol Westby

‘For we dream in narrative, daydream in narrative, remember, anticipate, hope, despair, believe, doubt, plan, revise, criticize, construct, gossip, learn, hate, and love by narrative. In order to really live, we make up stories about ourselves and others, about personal as well as the social, past and future” – Barbara Hardy

Early Childhood: Children begin building their narrative skills early in life. When a child tells you about an event that happened to them, they are telling you a narrative. As they start to build an autobiographical memory, they develop self-regulation skills.  We can help children build their autobiographical memory through meaningful and engaging activities.   Our Early Childhood Literacy Lab uses engaging stories and hands on activities to help children develop meaningful associations with the vocabulary and story. Interventions such as the Story Grammar Marker, The Storybook Journey, and Lively Letters help further build the foundation for literacy.

Early Childhood Literacy Lab is offered using The Storybook Journey curriculum

 

Elementary School: During the elementary school years, children develop many more complex skills. They tell stories that follow a sequence of events, demonstrate cause and effect, and indicate the goals of the characters. Children should have a much more developed theory of mind, understanding the beliefs and thoughts of themselves as well as the beliefs and thoughts of others. At this age, parts of the story are not always “spelled out” and children are expected to make inferences based on what they already know about the characters or situation. Our Elementary Literacy Lab uses books and stories to help teach these skills to students. Interventions such as the Expanding Expression Tool, SPACE framework, and Visualizing and Verbalizing ™ are utilized to help children develop these skills. The Lindamood-Bell Seeing Stars®: Symbol Imagery for Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words, and Spelling Program (SI) is used to successfully develop symbol imagery for reading and spelling and The Visualizing and Verbalizing® (V/V®) program develops concept imagery—the ability to create an imagined or imaged gestalt from language—as a basis for comprehension and higher order thinking. The development of concept imagery improves reading and listening comprehension, memory, oral vocabulary, critical thinking, and writing.

 

Middle School-High School: By the time children reach this age, they are able to tell more complex stories that follow a sequence of events, demonstrate cause and effect, and indicate the goals and plans of the characters. Narratives should also have a “turning point” and theme.  Children are required to do much more inferencing at this age, linking events in the story to something that happened earlier (working memory). Middle school and high school students have an even more developed theory of mind, understanding more complex motives and intentions of characters.  Understanding the thoughts and intentions of others requires well developed social thinking. At this age, children can reflect on themselves and link those qualities to events in their lives. They start to string important events in their lives together with a theme. There are called “life stories.” Life stories are extremely important since they are the lens through which we see ourselves. Our Middle School and High School Literacy Lab uses books and stories to help teach these skills to students. Interventions  such as the Expanding Expression Tool, SPACE framework, and autobiographies are utilized to help children develop these skills. The Lindamood-Bell Seeing Stars®: Symbol Imagery for Phonemic Awareness, Sight Words, and Spelling Program (SI) is used to successfully develop symbol imagery for reading and spelling and The Visualizing and Verbalizing® (V/V®) program develops concept imagery—the ability to create an imagined or imaged gestalt from language—as a basis for comprehension and higher order thinking. The development of concept imagery improves reading and listening comprehension, memory, oral vocabulary, critical thinking, and writing.

 

Literacy Labs are held at 2134 Welch St

Investment: $135 per session

Brooke's heart is in her work, and you can tell she loves what she does

Brooke has been working with my son Colton for about a year now. She is an amazing speech path and has created a great relationship with him during that time. He is always super excited to see her, and sees the time he spends with her as play time. Yet he’s always learning. Colton has an obsession with trains, and so generally wants to show her how his trains are set up every week. Brooke manages to incorporate whatever skill they are working on into this play. Whether it was putting more than one word together, or focusing on certain sounds, or not dropping the endings of words. She also leaves us with suggestions on what to do with him over the next week to help with the goal that we are currently working on.

Brooke’s heart is in her work, and you can tell she loves what she does. If you choose to work with her, you will be happy with the results you see. Colton had had an explosion of vocabulary this year, and I know she contributed greatly to that.

Autumn M

Does Your Child Need Help?